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Viewing topic "peace"

     
Posted on: February 10, 2009 @ 08:40 AM
FUNKTIONAL
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hi

a short film we made in Istanbul film festival [url=http://2009.ifistanbul.com/if-shorts/peace.aspx]http://2009.ifistanbul.com/if-shorts/peace.aspx [/url]
I am sorry that was synopsys you can find the movie here [url=http://web.me.com/nnaco/films_02/peace.html]http://web.me.com/nnaco/films_02/peace.html [/url]
peace

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Posted on: February 10, 2009 @ 01:43 PM
scotch
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Re: peace

This is completely off topic, I’m afraid, but I want to take advantage of a correspondent from Turkey. A friend told me Friday that Turkish is not an Indo-European language and completely unrelated to Romance, Germanic, and Slavic languages. As a native speaker (if you are one), what can you tell me about Turkish?

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Posted on: February 10, 2009 @ 05:30 PM
billrock
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Re: peace

I had a Turkish professor in college, I asked him the same question: he told me Turkish uses semetic structure and syllable pronounciation (like Semitic languages: Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic). But its script is Indo-European like all European languages (Sanskrit-style grammar).

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Posted on: February 11, 2009 @ 01:56 AM
Wastrel
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Re: peace

I had a Turkish professor in college, I asked him the same question: he told me Turkish uses semetic structure and syllable pronounciation (like Semitic languages: Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic). But its script is Indo-European like all European languages (Sanskrit-style grammar).

Turkish was primarily a phonetic, spoken language until Kemal Ataturk’s reforms in the 1920’s.
This from Wikipedia:

“On November 1, 1928, Mustafa Kemal introduced the Turkish alphabet as a replacement for Arabic script and as a solution to the literacy problem. Literate citizens of the country comprised as little as 10% of the population at the time. Dewey noted that learning how to read and write in Turkish with Arabic script took roughly three years with rather strenuous methods at the elementary level.[27] They used the Ottoman Language written in Arabic script with Arabic and Persian loan vocabulary.[27] The creation of the new Turkish alphabet as a variant of the Latin alphabet was undertaken by the Language Commission (Turkish: Dil Encümeni) with the initiative of Mustafa Kemal.[27] The tutelage was received from an Ottoman-Armenian calligrapher.[42] The first Turkish newspaper using the new alphabet published on December 15, 1928. Kemal himself actively encouraged people and made many trips to the countryside in order to teach the new alphabet. The adaptation to the new alphabet was very quick. Beginning in 1932, the People’s Houses (Turkish: Halk Evleri) opened throughout the country. The older population of Turkey received help at People’s Houses. There were congresses for discussing the issues of copyright, public education and scientific publishing. Literacy reform was also supported by strengthening the private publishing sector with a new law on copyrights.”

I learned a few phrases when I was in Eskesehir on a business trip and found it very hard to pick up due to an apparent lack of any sort of formal grammar. I’m sure there is one, I just couldn’t figure it out.

Bob

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Posted on: February 11, 2009 @ 04:26 AM
scotch
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Re: peace

Well, thanks for the information. I’m still hoping to hear from a native speaker.

[billrock] But its script is Indo-European like all European languages.

I suppose you mean it has recently adopted the Roman alphabet, as Wastrel’s Wikipedia quote points out. (I don’t know why Wikipedia insists on calling it the “Latin alphabet”.) Not all Indo-European languages use the Roman alphabet, however. Russian, which is a Slavic language (the Slavic languages, as I implied above, are subsumed by the Indo-European language group), uses the Cyrillic alphabet, of course, and various Indian languages (which we would also expect to be subsumed by the Indo-European group) such as Hindi and Gurajati (I know some native Gurajati speakers, and they’ve gone over this with me) use Devanageri.

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Posted on: February 12, 2009 @ 12:03 AM
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Re: peace

hi Scotch
sorry for the late reply,I have been away.Turkish is a Ural-Altaic language and is written with latin characters and it come from middle-asia.Actually,the phrase structure resembles a bit to old latin language,the verb is at the end of the sentence and has conjugation like the old latin language.
-----------------------------------------------PRESENT TENSE
I love=severim -----------------------------------seviyorum
you love=seversin------------------ ------------- seviyorsun
he/she loves=sever --------------------------- seviyor
we love=severiz----------------- ---------------- seviyoruz
you love=seversiniz ------------------- --------seviyorsunuz
they love=severler ------------------------------seviyorlar

I love you ------------------------- seni seviyorum

pronunciation is like italian,you read what you see
we don`t have x and q in our alphabet we have five extra letters which I am not able to put in this forum format.Thank you for your interest.I hope you like the movie
peace
burak
I=BEN
YOU=SEN
HE/SHE=O
WE=biz
you(pl)=siz
they=onlar
we usually omit using unless we want to emphasize

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